Dec 12, 201208:43 AMThe Telegraph

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TV Recap: Top 5 Things You Need To Know About Episode 9 Of 'Vegas'

Dec 12, 2012 - 08:43 AM
TV Recap: Top 5 Things You Need To Know About Episode 9 Of 'Vegas'

CBS

Dennis Quaid plays Sheriff Ralph Lamb in "Vegas"

 

Sheriff Ralph Lamb looks for a serial killer while Vincent Savino deals with a high roller in “Masquerade,” Episode 9 of Vegas. If you missed all the action Tuesday evening, here are the Top 5 things you need to know before tuning in next week. But be forewarned: This recap is loaded with spoilers.

LAST DANCE: When is showgirl is found strangled and murdered on the runway of a Vegas showroom stage, Sheriff Ralph Lamb, his deputies and assistant D.A. Katherine O’Connell quickly arrive at the scene of the crime. Right away, Ralph deduces that the woman had been killed before she was dressed in her skimpy stage outfit and posed on the stage like “a trophy.” It takes him a little longer to find the guilty party – though he’s immediately suspicious of a bullying choreographer (JB Blanc) with a history of snapping at the deceased.

CUTTING THE CARDS: Over at the Savoy, Vincent Savino is very happy to welcome Texas oilman Clay Stinson (David Denman), a high-stakes card player with a history of losing big – and not caring much about his losses, as long as he’s having a good time. Unfortunately, he has a very good time at the Savoy, where he wins a total of $1 million in a single evening. Even more unfortunately – for Vincent, who’s answerable to a very unforgiving mob boss – Clay announces his attention to quit while he’s ahead, having learned long ago to “go before the thrill wears off.”

SKIN GAME: Ralph discovers that Audrey Ballard, the murdered showgirl, had a part-time gig working (and posing) for a local sleazebag who edits a girlie magazine and produces “stag films.” So Ralph and his brother, deputy Jack Lamb, pay a visit to the sleazebag’s place of business, where they (a) learn Audrey recently paid $300 for the negatives of some very revealing photos she’d posed for, and (b) “convince” the sleazebag that he should relocate. Meanwhile, Katherine arranges a meeting with Audrey’s father, a conservative minister who’s deeply ashamed of his daughter. When the ADA tells him that Audrey has been killed, he doesn’t appear terribly unhappy.

DOUBLE OR NOTHING: Vincent desperately maneuvers to keep Clay from leaving town. Indeed, it’s strongly implied that one of his flunkies sabotages tracks near a local train depot, so Clay can’t leave as scheduled in his private railcar.  After all that, however, Clay refrains from making any high-stakes wagers – until Mia, Vincent’s beautiful counting-room manager, challenges him to a private card game. Vincent arrives on the scene just as Mia retrieves the $1 million with a winning hand. And while Vincent is happy about the outcome, he’s upset that Mia would have taken $1 million out of the casino vault to make the bet without his permission. Mia replies that she wasn’t betting money, but something more, ahem, personal. Something Clay really, really wanted. And may return to seek again.

END GAME: Katherine reveals to Ralph that she’s taken a personal interest in the showgirl murder case because, back when she was a teen-ager, a childhood friend was raped. Trouble is, the rapist escaped punishment -- her friend was too ashamed to report the crime, and pledged Katherine to secrecy -- and went on to rape again. She blames herself for the second crime, Katherine explains, because she might have somehow had the rapist arrested if she’d reported what she knew to the proper authorities. Which is why, when they discovered that Audrey was only the latest in a series of victims claimed by the same killer, Katherine vowed she would “not stand over another a dead girl and wonder what more I could have done.” So Audrey winds up placing herself in danger while ferreting out the culprit – a showroom pianist with a crush on the victim – and is nearly killed by the guy until Ralph and Jack show up in the nick of time.

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