Feb 5, 201305:43 PMThe Telegraph

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Western Words: New Book Releases For February 5, 2013

Feb 5, 2013 - 05:43 PM
Western Words: New Book Releases For February 5, 2013

Elvis Remembered: 1935-1977 by Gillian G. Gaar

There are hundreds of books already about Elvis, but very few that have been officially authorized by the Presley estate. Elvis Remembered: 1935-1977 is one of them. The book features many rare illustrations, including rarely seen photos from the Graceland archives, recreations of Elvis memorabilia, and a DVD of live performances, interviews and press conferences. There’s even a copy of Elvis’s first contract with Colonel Tom Parker — which should serve as an excellent guide for young musicians on what not to sign when you’re starting your career.

 

Arapaho Women's Quillwork: Motion, Life, and Creativity by Jeffrey D. Anderson

Many Native American tribes counted quillwork among their artistic pursuits, but the women of the Arapaho tribe seemed particularly gifted at this remarkable discipline. Quillwork played an important role in Arapaho religious life, and was a part of nearly all of their special ceremonies and day-to-day lives. Jeffrey D. Anderson’s book includes more than 50 color and black-and-white images of Arapaho quillwork throughout the centuries. 

 

American Indians in British Art, 1700-1840 by Stephanie Pratt

We tend to think of Native American art as being produced only by Native Americans or western artists. But in the 18th century, when the British allied themselves with Indian tribes during the days of the colonial rebellion, artists from England became fascinated with America’s native population.

American Indians in British Art, 1700-1840 looks at the works produced by these artists. A wide range of styles is represented, from idealized portraits to realistic depictions of tribal life. Pratt offers insightful commentary that helps readers look beyond the images to the messages contained therein.

 

Sacred Land, Sacred View: Navajo Perceptions of the Four Corners Region by Robert S. McPherson

What Israel is to the Jewish faith, so the Four Corners region of the Southwest is to the Navajo. Robert McPherson explores the spiritual significance of the cliffs, spires and other landmarks of this dramatic desert landscape. It’s a place that is worth a visit for the stunning natural scenery alone; but those who first read Sacred Land, Sacred View will also gain a deeper appreciation for this special place, and discover how the Navajo read their environment as a spiritual text.

 

Let the Wolf Howl by Matthew White

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is not a common topic in Western fiction. But in Let the Wolf Howl, Matthew White introduces readers to young Buck Carver, who struggles with anxieties that other boys don’t. Life on an East Texas ranch in the 1880s has enough difficulties, but Buck has issues that were not yet diagnosed, and has to find ways to cope with his everyday fears. A friend, Cherokee Jack, helps him through the discomfort that comes with OCD, telling him there are times he must “let the wolf howl,” but not feed his fears. The book builds to a tense climax where Buck has no choice but to face his condition head on, with lives on the line.


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